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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Nearsighted (Myopia)

Nearsighted (Myopia)

Nearsightedness, technically known as myopia, is a condition which causes difficulty focusing on objects at a distance, while near vision remains normal. Myopia is one of the most common vision problems worldwide and it is on the rise.

Myopia Signs and Symptoms

People with myopia are usually able to see well up close, but have difficulty seeing objects at a distance. Due to the fact that they may be straining or squinting to see into the distance, they may develop headaches, eye fatigue or eye strain.

Myopia Causes

Myopia is a refractive error caused by an irregular shaped cornea that affects the way light is focused on the retina. For clear vision, light should come to a focus point directly onto the retina. In myopia, the cornea is longer than usual, resulting in a focus point that falls in front of the retina, causing distant objects to appear blurry, while close objects can be seen normally.

Myopia typically has a genetic component as it often appears in multiple members of a family and it usually begins to show signs during childhood, often getting progressively worse until stabilizing around age 20. There may also be environmental factors that contribute to myopia such as work that requires focusing on close objects for an extended period of time and spending too much time indoors.

Diagnosis of Myopia

Myopia is diagnosed by an eye examination with an qualified optometrist. During the exam the optometrist will determine the visual acuity of the eye to prescribe eye glasses or contact lenses. A prescription for myopia will be a negative number such as -1.75.

Treatment for Myopia

Myopia is typically treated with corrective eyeglasses or contact lenses and in certain cases refractive surgery such as LASIK or PRK is an option. Surgery is the most risky treatment as it requires permanently changing the shape of the cornea. Other treatments involve implanting a lens that reshapes the cornea called a phakic intra-ocular lens or vision therapy. A treatment called Ortho-k, in which the patient wears corneal reshaping contact lenses at night to see without correction during the day can be another option.

While some people require vision correction throughout the day, others may only need it only during certain tasks such as driving, watching television or viewing a whiteboard in school. The type of treatment depends on the overall health of your eye and your eye and vision needs.

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The pandemic of coronavirus (COVID 19) continues to spread endangering many of us who call Midland/Odessa home. While the number of cases in Texas is growing rapidly, so far there are few cases in our area. At Vision Health Specialties it is our goal to keep it that way.

Because eye care by necessity requires close contact between workers and patients, the Center for Disease Control along with other eye care specialty organizations recommend that during this critical period eye doctors suspend routine vision examinations. In complying with this, Vision Health Specialties will terminate routine eye care beginning Monday, March 23‎rd until Monday, April 20th. We will be open from 9:00 till 4:00 PM during this period of time with a small staff to handle urgencies such as red eyes, corneal ulcers, uveitis, abrasions, sudden increases in floaters, or flashes, and foreign bodies in the eye. Please call our office before coming in. Furthermore, those who have traveled to China, Italy, South Korea, Japan, Iran, or the state of Washington, California, New York, Louisiana and/or other affected areas, as well as those who have respiratory disease, and/or fever, will be referred to the emergency department of Midland Memorial Hospital where they are equipped to handle those at risk of coronavirus.